Skip Navigation

Home

Our thanks to the Arts and Humanities Research Council for funding the Madness and Literature Network. Each year the AHRC provides funding from the Government to support research and postgraduate study in the arts and humanities, from archaeology and English literature to design and dance. The range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK. Further information on the AHRC is available on their website.

This project builds on a current project with The Leverhulme Trust on the representation of madness in post-war British and American Fiction. Membership to the Madness and Literature Network is free - Please register under ‘New User Registration’. Benefits of membership include the possibility of attending our invitation-only seminars, being kept fully informed of developments in the broad field of Health Humanities here at Nottingham, and the opportunity to submit fully peer-reviewed book reviews to our database, which will be accredited to the submitting reviewer.

Please note, you are welcome to use these resources and the website for teaching or other purposes, however please do drop us a line and let us know how you are finding the site, or any suggestions you may have for improvements. charlotte.l.baker@nottingham.ac.uk. Thank you.

Bibliography of First-Person Narratives of Madness in English (5th edition)

The 5th edition of the Bibliography of First-Person Narratives of Madness in English is available for download (PDF)

1st International Health Humanities Conference: Madness and Literature was held at Nottingham 6th - 8th August 2010

1st International Health Humanities Conference: Madness and Literature was held at Nottingham 6th - 8th August 2010. See 'Seminars and Conference' for further details.

1st International Health Humanities Conference: Madness and Literature - Conference Programme

Revealing Read

Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

By Marya Hornbacher

Review

Mayra Hornbacher’s autobiographical text Wasted is a searingly honest, at times painfully so, account of her anorexia and bulimia, from its early childhood roots through adolescence and into adulthood. Hornbacher’s entire existence is contained within calories, exercise, food, weight and self-hatred.  She also reveals the tricks that she used to evade hospitalisation, as well as the negligence of inexperienced clinical staff that allow her illness to continue unabated while she appears ‘well’. One of the elements that make this text both readable and useful from a clinical perspective is her comment on the cultural aetiology of eating disorders – society’s obsessive focus on the body, beauty, thinness, health.  This fixation – most commonly around women’s bodies but increasingly around the male figure – perpetuates and maintains the stereotypes within which no one can win – too thin, too fat, never a happy medium.

View More Revealing Reads

The School of English Studies
in collaboration with the Schools of Nursing and Sociology and Social Policy

MA in Health Communication
(by web-based distance learning)

Meeting the challenges of communication - The MA programme in Health Communication provides a unique opportunity to investigate language and communication in various health care contexts. The course gives students a thorough grounding in the concepts, theories and research methods used in this area.

MA in Health Communication PDF Leaflet

Events

Unfortunately there are no events at the current time.